Gutenberg Project EText

Just another The University Blog site

Story

April23

This Etext file is presented by Project Gutenberg, in
cooperation with World Library, Inc., from their Library of the
Future and Shakespeare CDROMS.  Project Gutenberg often releases
Etexts that are NOT placed in the Public Domain!!

*This Etext has certain copyright implications you should read!*

<<THIS ELECTRONIC VERSION OF THE COMPLETE WORKS OF WILLIAM
SHAKESPEARE IS COPYRIGHT 1990-1993 BY WORLD LIBRARY, INC., AND IS
PROVIDED BY PROJECT GUTENBERG WITH PERMISSION.  ELECTRONIC AND
MACHINE READABLE COPIES MAY BE DISTRIBUTED SO LONG AS SUCH COPIES
(1) ARE FOR YOUR OR OTHERS PERSONAL USE ONLY, AND (2) ARE NOT
DISTRIBUTED OR USED COMMERCIALLY.  PROHIBITED COMMERCIAL
DISTRIBUTION INCLUDES BY ANY SERVICE THAT CHARGES FOR DOWNLOAD
TIME OR FOR MEMBERSHIP.>>

*Project Gutenberg is proud to cooperate with The World Library*
in the presentation of The Complete Works of William Shakespeare
for your reading for education and entertainment.  HOWEVER, THIS
IS NEITHER SHAREWARE NOR PUBLIC DOMAIN. . .AND UNDER THE LIBRARY
OF THE FUTURE CONDITIONS OF THIS PRESENTATION. . .NO CHARGES MAY
BE MADE FOR *ANY* ACCESS TO THIS MATERIAL.  YOU ARE ENCOURAGED!!
TO GIVE IT AWAY TO ANYONE YOU LIKE, BUT NO CHARGES ARE ALLOWED!!

**Welcome To The World of Free Plain Vanilla Electronic Texts**

**Etexts Readable By Both Humans and By Computers, Since 1971**

*These Etexts Prepared By Hundreds of Volunteers and Donations*

Information on contacting Project Gutenberg to get Etexts, and
further information is included below.  We need your donations.

The Complete Works of William Shakespeare
The Tragedy of Macbeth

June, 1999  [Etext #1795]

The Library of the Future Complete Works of William Shakespeare
Library of the Future is a TradeMark (TM) of World Library Inc.
******This file should be named 1ws3411.txt or 1ws3411.zip*****

Corrected EDITIONS of our etexts get a new NUMBER, 1ws3412.txt
VERSIONS based on separate sources get new NUMBER, 2ws3410.txt

The official release date of all Project Gutenberg Etexts is at
Midnight, Central Time, of the last day of the stated month.  A
preliminary version may often be posted for suggestion, comment
and editing by those who wish to do so.  To be sure you have an
up to date first edition [xxxxx10x.xxx] please check file sizes
in the first week of the next month.

Information about Project Gutenberg (one page)

We produce about two million dollars for each hour we work.  The
fifty hours is one conservative estimate for how long it we take
to get any etext selected, entered, proofread, edited, copyright
searched and analyzed, the copyright letters written, etc.  This
projected audience is one hundred million readers.  If our value
per text is nominally estimated at one dollar, then we produce 2
million dollars per hour this year we, will have to do four text
files per month:  thus upping our productivity from one million.
The Goal of Project Gutenberg is to Give Away One Trillion Etext
Files by the December 31, 2001.  [10,000 x 100,000,000=Trillion]
This is ten thousand titles each to one hundred million readers,
which is 10% of the expected number of computer users by the end
of the year 2001.

We need your donations more than ever!

All donations should be made to "Project Gutenberg/CMU", and are
tax deductible to the extent allowable by law ("CMU" is Carnegie
Mellon University).

Please mail to:

Project Gutenberg
P. O. Box  2782
Champaign, IL 61825

You can visit our web site at promo.net for complete information
about Project Gutenberg.

When all other else fails try our Executive Director:
dircompg@pobox.com or hart@pobox.com

******

**Information prepared by the Project Gutenberg legal advisor**

***** SMALL PRINT! for COMPLETE SHAKESPEARE *****

THIS ELECTRONIC VERSION OF THE COMPLETE WORKS OF WILLIAM
SHAKESPEARE IS COPYRIGHT 1990-1993 BY WORLD LIBRARY, INC.,
AND IS PROVIDED BY PROJECT GUTENBERG ETEXT OF
CARNEGIE MELLON UNIVERSITY WITH PERMISSION.

Since unlike many other Project Gutenberg-tm etexts, this etext
is copyright protected, and since the materials and methods you
use will effect the Projects reputation, your right to copy and
distribute it is limited by the copyright and other laws, and by
the conditions of this "Small Print!" statement.

1.  LICENSE

  A) YOU MAY (AND ARE ENCOURAGED) TO DISTRIBUTE ELECTRONIC AND
MACHINE READABLE COPIES OF THIS ETEXT, SO LONG AS SUCH COPIES
(1) ARE FOR YOUR OR OTHERS PERSONAL USE ONLY, AND (2) ARE NOT
DISTRIBUTED OR USED COMMERCIALLY.  PROHIBITED COMMERCIAL
DISTRIBUTION INCLUDES BY ANY SERVICE THAT CHARGES FOR DOWNLOAD
TIME OR FOR MEMBERSHIP.

  B) This license is subject to the conditions that you honor
the refund and replacement provisions of this "small print!"
statement; and that you distribute exact copies of this etext,
including this Small Print statement.  Such copies can be
compressed or any proprietary form (including any form resulting
from word processing or hypertext software), so long as
*EITHER*:

    (1) The etext, when displayed, is clearly readable, and does
  *not* contain characters other than those intended by the
  author of the work, although tilde (~), asterisk (*) and
  underline (_) characters may be used to convey punctuation
  intended by the author, and additional characters may be used
  to indicate hypertext links; OR

    (2) The etext is readily convertible by the reader at no
  expense into plain ASCII, EBCDIC or equivalent form by the
  program that displays the etext (as is the case, for instance,
  with most word processors); OR

    (3) You provide or agree to provide on request at no
  additional cost, fee or expense, a copy of the etext in plain
  ASCII.

2.  LIMITED WARRANTY; DISCLAIMER OF DAMAGES

This etext may contain a "Defect" in the form of incomplete,
inaccurate or corrupt data, transcription errors, a copyright or
other infringement, a defective or damaged disk, computer virus,
or codes that damage or cannot be read by your equipment.  But
for the "Right of Replacement or Refund" described below, the
Project (and any other party you may receive this etext from as
a PROJECT GUTENBERG-tm etext) disclaims all liability to you for
damages, costs and expenses, including legal fees, and YOU HAVE
NO REMEDIES FOR NEGLIGENCE OR UNDER STRICT LIABILITY, OR FOR
BREACH OF WARRANTY OR CONTRACT, INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO
INDIRECT, CONSEQUENTIAL, PUNITIVE OR INCIDENTAL DAMAGES, EVEN IF
YOU GIVE NOTICE OF THE POSSIBILITY OF SUCH DAMAGES.

If you discover a Defect in this etext within 90 days of receiv-
ing it, you can receive a refund of the money (if any) you paid
for it by sending an explanatory note within that time to the
person you received it from.  If you received it on a physical
medium, you must return it with your note, and such person may
choose to alternatively give you a replacement copy.  If you
received it electronically, such person may choose to
alternatively give you a second opportunity to receive it
electronically.

THIS ETEXT IS OTHERWISE PROVIDED TO YOU "AS-IS".  NO OTHER
WARRANTIES OF ANY KIND, EXPRESS OR IMPLIED, ARE MADE TO YOU AS
TO THE ETEXT OR ANY MEDIUM IT MAY BE ON, INCLUDING BUT NOT
LIMITED TO WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY OR FITNESS FOR A
PARTICULAR PURPOSE.  Some states do not allow disclaimers of
implied warranties or the exclusion or limitation of consequen-
tial damages, so the above disclaimers and exclusions may not
apply to you, and you may have other legal rights.

3.  INDEMNITY: You will indemnify and hold the Project, its
directors, officers, members and agents harmless from all lia-
bility, cost and expense, including legal fees, that arise
directly or indirectly from any of the following that you do or
cause: [A] distribution of this etext, [B] alteration,
modification, or addition to the etext, or [C] any Defect.

4.  WHAT IF YOU *WANT* TO SEND MONEY EVEN IF YOU DONT HAVE TO?
Project Gutenberg is dedicated to increasing the number of
public domain and licensed works that can be freely distributed
in machine readable form.  The Project gratefully accepts
contributions in money, time, scanning machines, OCR software,
public domain etexts, royalty free copyright licenses, and
whatever else you can think of.  Money should be paid to "Pro-
ject Gutenberg Association / Carnegie Mellon University".

WRITE TO US! We can be reached at:
     Internet: hart@pobox.com
        Mail:  Prof. Michael Hart
               P.O. Box 2782
               Champaign, IL 61825

This "Small Print!" by Charles B. Kramer, Attorney
Internet (72600.2026@compuserve.com); TEL: (212-254-5093)
****   SMALL PRINT! FOR __ COMPLETE SHAKESPEARE ****
["Small Print" V.12.08.93]

<<THIS ELECTRONIC VERSION OF THE COMPLETE WORKS OF WILLIAM
SHAKESPEARE IS COPYRIGHT 1990-1993 BY WORLD LIBRARY, INC., AND IS
PROVIDED BY PROJECT GUTENBERG ETEXT OF CARNEGIE MELLON UNIVERSITY
WITH PERMISSION.  ELECTRONIC AND MACHINE READABLE COPIES MAY BE
DISTRIBUTED SO LONG AS SUCH COPIES (1) ARE FOR YOUR OR OTHERS
PERSONAL USE ONLY, AND (2) ARE NOT DISTRIBUTED OR USED
COMMERCIALLY.  PROHIBITED COMMERCIAL DISTRIBUTION INCLUDES BY ANY
SERVICE THAT CHARGES FOR DOWNLOAD TIME OR FOR MEMBERSHIP.>>

1606

THE TRAGEDY OF MACBETH

by William Shakespeare

Dramatis Personae

  DUNCAN, King of Scotland
  MACBETH, Thane of Glamis and Cawdor, a general in the Kings
army
  LADY MACBETH, his wife
  MACDUFF, Thane of Fife, a nobleman of Scotland
  LADY MACDUFF, his wife
  MALCOLM, elder son of Duncan
  DONALBAIN, younger son of Duncan
  BANQUO, Thane of Lochaber, a general in the Kings army
  FLEANCE, his son
  LENNOX, nobleman of Scotland
  ROSS, nobleman of Scotland
  MENTEITH nobleman of Scotland
  ANGUS, nobleman of Scotland
  CAITHNESS, nobleman of Scotland
  SIWARD, Earl of Northumberland, general of the English forces
  YOUNG SIWARD, his son
  SEYTON, attendant to Macbeth
  HECATE, Queen of the Witches
  The Three Witches
  Boy, Son of Macduff 
  Gentlewoman attending on Lady Macbeth
  An English Doctor
  A Scottish Doctor
  A Sergeant
  A Porter
  An Old Man
  The Ghost of Banquo and other Apparitions
  Lords, Gentlemen, Officers, Soldiers, Murtherers, Attendants,
     and Messengers

<<THIS ELECTRONIC VERSION OF THE COMPLETE WORKS OF WILLIAM
SHAKESPEARE IS COPYRIGHT 1990-1993 BY WORLD LIBRARY, INC., AND IS
PROVIDED BY PROJECT GUTENBERG ETEXT OF CARNEGIE MELLON UNIVERSITY
WITH PERMISSION.  ELECTRONIC AND MACHINE READABLE COPIES MAY BE
DISTRIBUTED SO LONG AS SUCH COPIES (1) ARE FOR YOUR OR OTHERS
PERSONAL USE ONLY, AND (2) ARE NOT DISTRIBUTED OR USED
COMMERCIALLY.  PROHIBITED COMMERCIAL DISTRIBUTION INCLUDES BY ANY
SERVICE THAT CHARGES FOR DOWNLOAD TIME OR FOR MEMBERSHIP.>>

SCENE: Scotland and England

ACT I. SCENE I.
A desert place. Thunder and lightning.

Enter three Witches.

  FIRST WITCH. When shall we three meet again?
    In thunder, lightning, or in rain?
  SECOND WITCH. When the hurlyburlys done,
    When the battles lost and won.
  THIRD WITCH. That will be ere the set of sun.
  FIRST WITCH. Where the place?
  SECOND WITCH. Upon the heath.
  THIRD WITCH. There to meet with Macbeth.
  FIRST WITCH. I come, Graymalkin.
  ALL. Paddock calls. Anon!
    Fair is foul, and foul is fair.
    Hover through the fog and filthy air.                Exeunt.

SCENE II.
A camp near Forres. Alarum within.

Enter Duncan, Malcolm, Donalbain, Lennox, with Attendants,
meeting a bleeding Sergeant.

  DUNCAN. What bloody man is that? He can report,
    As seemeth by his plight, of the revolt
    The newest state.
  MALCOLM. This is the sergeant
    Who like a good and hardy soldier fought
    Gainst my captivity. Hail, brave friend!
    Say to the King the knowledge of the broil
    As thou didst leave it.
  SERGEANT. Doubtful it stood,
    As two spent swimmers that do cling together
    And choke their art. The merciless Macdonwald-
    Worthy to be a rebel, for to that
    The multiplying villainies of nature
    Do swarm upon him -from the Western Isles
    Of kerns and gallowglasses is supplied;
    And Fortune, on his damned quarrel smiling, 
    Showd like a rebels whore. But alls too weak;
    For brave Macbeth -well he deserves that name-
    Disdaining Fortune, with his brandishd steel,
    Which smoked with bloody execution,
    Like Valors minion carved out his passage
    Till he faced the slave,
    Which neer shook hands, nor bade farewell to him,
    Till he unseamd him from the nave to the chaps,
    And fixd his head upon our battlements.
  DUNCAN. O valiant cousin! Worthy gentleman!
  SERGEANT. As whence the sun gins his reflection
    Shipwrecking storms and direful thunders break,
    So from that spring whence comfort seemd to come
    Discomfort swells. Mark, King of Scotland, mark.
    No sooner justice had, with valor armd,
    Compelld these skipping kerns to trust their heels,
    But the Norweyan lord, surveying vantage,
    With furbishd arms and new supplies of men,
    Began a fresh assault.
  DUNCAN. Dismayd not this 
    Our captains, Macbeth and Banquo?
  SERGEANT. Yes,
    As sparrows eagles, or the hare the lion.
    If I say sooth, I must report they were
    As cannons overcharged with double cracks,
    So they
    Doubly redoubled strokes upon the foe.
    Except they meant to bathe in reeking wounds,
    Or memorize another Golgotha,
    I cannot tell-
    But I am faint; my gashes cry for help.
  DUNCAN. So well thy words become thee as thy wounds;
    They smack of honor both. Go get him surgeons.
                                        Exit Sergeant, attended.
    Who comes here?

                       Enter Ross.

  MALCOLM. The worthy Thane of Ross.
  LENNOX. What a haste looks through his eyes! So should he look 
    That seems to speak things strange.
  ROSS. God save the King!
  DUNCAN. Whence camest thou, worthy Thane?
  ROSS. From Fife, great King,
    Where the Norweyan banners flout the sky
    And fan our people cold.
    Norway himself, with terrible numbers,
    Assisted by that most disloyal traitor
    The Thane of Cawdor, began a dismal conflict,
    Till that Bellonas bridegroom, lappd in proof,
    Confronted him with self-comparisons,
    Point against point rebellious, arm gainst arm,
    Curbing his lavish spirit; and, to conclude,
    The victory fell on us.
  DUNCAN. Great happiness!
  ROSS. That now
    Sweno, the Norways king, craves composition;
    Nor would we deign him burial of his men
    Till he disbursed, at Saint Colmes Inch,
    Ten thousand dollars to our general use. 
  DUNCAN. No more that Thane of Cawdor shall deceive
    Our bosom interest. Go pronounce his present death,
    And with his former title greet Macbeth.
  ROSS. Ill see it done.
  DUNCAN. What he hath lost, noble Macbeth hath won.
                                                         Exeunt.

SCENE III.
A heath. Thunder.

Enter the three Witches.

  FIRST WITCH. Where hast thou been, sister?
  SECOND WITCH. Killing swine.
  THIRD WITCH. Sister, where thou?
  FIRST WITCH. A sailors wife had chestnuts in her lap,
    And mounchd, and mounchd, and mounchd. "Give me," quoth I.
    "Aroint thee, witch!" the rump-fed ronyon cries.
    Her husbands to Aleppo gone, master o the Tiger;
    But in a sieve Ill thither sail,
    And, like a rat without a tail,
    Ill do, Ill do, and Ill do.
  SECOND WITCH. Ill give thee a wind.
  FIRST WITCH. Thourt kind.
  THIRD WITCH. And I another.
  FIRST WITCH. I myself have all the other,
    And the very ports they blow,
    All the quarters that they know
    I the shipmans card. 
    I will drain him dry as hay:
    Sleep shall neither night nor day
    Hang upon his penthouse lid;
    He shall live a man forbid.
    Weary sennights nine times nine
    Shall he dwindle, peak, and pine;
    Though his bark cannot be lost,
    Yet it shall be tempest-tossd.
    Look what I have.
  SECOND WITCH. Show me, show me.
  FIRST WITCH. Here I have a pilots thumb,
    Wreckd as homeward he did come.                Drum within.
  THIRD WITCH. A drum, a drum!
    Macbeth doth come.
  ALL. The weird sisters, hand in hand,
    Posters of the sea and land,
    Thus do go about, about,
    Thrice to thine, and thrice to mine,
    And thrice again, to make up nine.
    Peace! The charms wound up. 

                 Enter Macbeth and Banquo.

  MACBETH. So foul and fair a day I have not seen.
  BANQUO. How far ist calld to Forres? What are these
    So witherd and so wild in their attire,
    That look not like the inhabitants o the earth,
    And yet are ont? Live you? or are you aught
    That man may question? You seem to understand me,
    By each at once her choppy finger laying
    Upon her skinny lips. You should be women,
    And yet your beards forbid me to interpret
    That you are so.
  MACBETH. Speak, if you can. What are you?
  FIRST WITCH. All hail, Macbeth, hail to thee, Thane of Glamis!
  SECOND WITCH. All hail, Macbeth, hail to thee, Thane of Cawdor!
  THIRD WITCH. All hail, Macbeth, that shalt be King hereafter!
  BANQUO. Good sir, why do you start, and seem to fear
    Things that do sound so fair? I the name of truth,
    Are ye fantastical or that indeed 
    Which outwardly ye show? My noble partner
    You greet with present grace and great prediction
    Of noble having and of royal hope,
    That he seems rapt withal. To me you speak not.
    If you can look into the seeds of time,
    And say which grain will grow and which will not,
    Speak then to me, who neither beg nor fear
    Your favors nor your hate.
  FIRST WITCH. Hail!
  SECOND WITCH. Hail!
  THIRD WITCH. Hail!
  FIRST WITCH. Lesser than Macbeth, and greater.
  SECOND WITCH. Not so happy, yet much happier.
  THIRD WITCH. Thou shalt get kings, though thou be none.
    So all hail, Macbeth and Banquo!
  FIRST WITCH. Banquo and Macbeth, all hail!
  MACBETH. Stay, you imperfect speakers, tell me more.
    By Sinels death I know I am Thane of Glamis;
    But how of Cawdor? The Thane of Cawdor lives,
    A prosperous gentleman; and to be King 
    Stands not within the prospect of belief,
    No more than to be Cawdor. Say from whence
    You owe this strange intelligence, or why
    Upon this blasted heath you stop our way
    With such prophetic greeting? Speak, I charge you.
                                                 Witches vanish.
  BANQUO. The earth hath bubbles as the water has,
    And these are of them. Whither are they vanishd?
  MACBETH. Into the air, and what seemd corporal melted
    As breath into the wind. Would they had stayd!
  BANQUO. Were such things here as we do speak about?
    Or have we eaten on the insane root
    That takes the reason prisoner?
  MACBETH. Your children shall be kings.
  BANQUO. You shall be King.
  MACBETH. And Thane of Cawdor too. Went it not so?
  BANQUO. To the selfsame tune and words. Whos here?

                Enter Ross and Angus.

BERITA BINUS : LEBIH DARI 11.000 MAHASISWA BARU RESMI MENJADI BINUSIAN

posted under Uncategorized

Email will not be published

Website example

Your Comment: