Gutenberg Project EText

Just another The University Blog site

Welcome To The World of Free Plain Vanilla Electronic Texts

August30

*Project Gutenbergs Etext of Songs for Parents, by John Farrar*

Copyright laws are changing all over the world, be sure to check
the copyright laws for your country before posting these files!!

Please take a look at the important information in this header.
We encourage you to keep this file on your own disk, keeping an
electronic path open for the next readers.  Do not remove this.

**Welcome To The World of Free Plain Vanilla Electronic Texts**

**Etexts Readable By Both Humans and By Computers, Since 1971**

*These Etexts Prepared By Hundreds of Volunteers and Donations*

Information on contacting Project Gutenberg to get Etexts, and
further information is included below.  We need your donations.

Songs for Parents

by John Farrar

March, 1999  [Etext #1664]

*Project Gutenbergs Etext of Songs for Parents, by John Farrar*
******This file should be named sfpar11.txt or sfpar11.zip******

Corrected EDITIONS of our etexts get a new NUMBER, sfpar12.txt.
VERSIONS based on separate sources get new LETTER, sfpar10a.txt.

This Etext was prepared by Stewart A. Levin of Englewood CO with
additional biographical information provided by Curtis Farrar of
Washington, D.C.

Project Gutenberg Etexts are usually created from multiple editions,
all of which are in the Public Domain in the United States, unless a
copyright notice is included.  Therefore, we do NOT keep these books
in compliance with any particular paper edition, usually otherwise.

We are now trying to release all our books one month in advance
of the official release dates, for time for better editing.

Please note:  neither this list nor its contents are final till
midnight of the last day of the month of any such announcement.
The official release date of all Project Gutenberg Etexts is at
Midnight, Central Time, of the last day of the stated month.  A
preliminary version may often be posted for suggestion, comment
and editing by those who wish to do so.  To be sure you have an
up to date first edition [xxxxx10x.xxx] please check file sizes
in the first week of the next month.  Since our ftp program has
a bug in it that scrambles the date [tried to fix and failed] a
look at the file size will have to do, but we will try to see a
new copy has at least one byte more or less.

Information about Project Gutenberg (one page)

We produce about two million dollars for each hour we work.  The
time it takes us, a rather conservative estimate, is fifty hours
to get any etext selected, entered, proofread, edited, copyright
searched and analyzed, the copyright letters written, etc.  This
projected audience is one hundred million readers.  If our value
per text is nominally estimated at one dollar then we produce $2
million dollars per hour this year as we release thirty-six text
files per month, or 432 more Etexts in 1999 for a total of 2000+
If these reach just 10% of the computerized population, then the
total should reach over 200 billion Etexts given away.

The Goal of Project Gutenberg is to Give Away One Trillion Etext
Files by the December 31, 2001.  [10,000 x 100,000,000=Trillion]
This is ten thousand titles each to one hundred million readers,
which is only 10% of the present number of computer users.

At our revised rates of production, we will reach only one-third
of that goal by the end of 2001, or about 3,333 Etexts unless we
manage to get some real funding; currently our funding is mostly
from Michael Harts salary at Carnegie-Mellon University, and an
assortment of sporadic gifts; this salary is only good for a few
more years, so we are looking for something to replace it, as we
dont want Project Gutenberg to be so dependent on one person.

We need your donations more than ever!

All donations should be made to Project Gutenberg/CMU: and are
tax deductible to the extent allowable by law.  (CMU = Carnegie-
Mellon University).

For these and other matters, please mail to:

Project Gutenberg
P. O. Box  2782
Champaign, IL 61825

When all other email fails try our Executive Director:
Michael S. Hart <hart@pobox.com>.
hart@pobox.com forwards to hart@prairienet.org and archive.org.
If your mail bounces from archive.org, I will still see it, if
it bounces from prairienet.org, better resend later on. . . .

We would prefer to send you this information by email.

******

To access Project Gutenberg etexts, use any Web browser
to view http://promo.net.pg.  This site lists Etexts by
author and by title, and includes information about how
to get involved with Project Gutenberg.  You could also
download our past Newsletters, or subscribe here.  This
is one of our major sites, please email hart@pobox.com,
for a more complete list of our various sites.

To go directly to the etext collections, use FTP or any
Web browser to visit a Project Gutenberg mirror (mirror
sites are available on 7 continents; mirrors are listed
at http://promo.net/pg).

Mac users, do NOT point and click, typing works better.

Example FTP session:

ftp sunsite.unc.edu
login:  anonymous
password:  your@login
cd pub/docs/books/gutenberg
cd etext90 through etext98
dir [to see files]
get or mget [to get files. . .set bin for zip files]
GET GUTINDEX.??  [to get a years listing of books, e.g., GUTINDEX.99]
GET GUTINDEX.ALL [to get a listing of ALL books]

***

**Information prepared by the Project Gutenberg legal advisor**
(Three Pages)

***START**THE SMALL PRINT!**FOR PUBLIC DOMAIN ETEXTS**START***
Why is this Small Print! statement here?  You know: lawyers.
They tell us you might sue us if there is something wrong with
your copy of this etext, even if you got it for free from
someone other than us, and even if whats wrong is not our
fault.  So, among other things, this Small Print! statement
disclaims most of our liability to you.  It also tells you how
you can distribute copies of this etext if you want to.

*BEFORE!* YOU USE OR READ THIS ETEXT
By using or reading any part of this PROJECT GUTENBERG-tm
etext, you indicate that you understand, agree to and accept
this Small Print! statement.  If you do not, you can receive
a refund of the money (if any) you paid for this etext by
sending a request within 30 days of receiving it to the person
you got it from.  If you received this etext on a physical
medium (such as a disk), you must return it with your request.

ABOUT PROJECT GUTENBERG-TM ETEXTS
This PROJECT GUTENBERG-tm etext, like most PROJECT GUTENBERG-
tm etexts, is a public domain work distributed by Professor
Michael S. Hart through the Project Gutenberg Association at
Carnegie-Mellon University (the Project).  Among other
things, this means that no one owns a United States copyright
on or for this work, so the Project (and you!) can copy and
distribute it in the United States without permission and
without paying copyright royalties.  Special rules, set forth
below, apply if you wish to copy and distribute this etext
under the Projects PROJECT GUTENBERG trademark.

To create these etexts, the Project expends considerable
efforts to identify, transcribe and proofread public domain
works.  Despite these efforts, the Projects etexts and any
medium they may be on may contain Defects.  Among other
things, Defects may take the form of incomplete, inaccurate or
corrupt data, transcription errors, a copyright or other
intellectual property infringement, a defective or damaged
disk or other etext medium, a computer virus, or computer
codes that damage or cannot be read by your equipment.

LIMITED WARRANTY; DISCLAIMER OF DAMAGES
But for the Right of Replacement or Refund described below,
[1] the Project (and any other party you may receive this
etext from as a PROJECT GUTENBERG-tm etext) disclaims all
liability to you for damages, costs and expenses, including
legal fees, and [2] YOU HAVE NO REMEDIES FOR NEGLIGENCE OR
UNDER STRICT LIABILITY, OR FOR BREACH OF WARRANTY OR CONTRACT,
INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO INDIRECT, CONSEQUENTIAL, PUNITIVE
OR INCIDENTAL DAMAGES, EVEN IF YOU GIVE NOTICE OF THE
POSSIBILITY OF SUCH DAMAGES.

If you discover a Defect in this etext within 90 days of
receiving it, you can receive a refund of the money (if any)
you paid for it by sending an explanatory note within that
time to the person you received it from.  If you received it
on a physical medium, you must return it with your note, and
such person may choose to alternatively give you a replacement
copy.  If you received it electronically, such person may
choose to alternatively give you a second opportunity to
receive it electronically.

THIS ETEXT IS OTHERWISE PROVIDED TO YOU AS-IS.  NO OTHER
WARRANTIES OF ANY KIND, EXPRESS OR IMPLIED, ARE MADE TO YOU AS
TO THE ETEXT OR ANY MEDIUM IT MAY BE ON, INCLUDING BUT NOT
LIMITED TO WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY OR FITNESS FOR A
PARTICULAR PURPOSE.

Some states do not allow disclaimers of implied warranties or
the exclusion or limitation of consequential damages, so the
above disclaimers and exclusions may not apply to you, and you
may have other legal rights.

INDEMNITY
You will indemnify and hold the Project, its directors,
officers, members and agents harmless from all liability, cost
and expense, including legal fees, that arise directly or
indirectly from any of the following that you do or cause:
[1] distribution of this etext, [2] alteration, modification,
or addition to the etext, or [3] any Defect.

DISTRIBUTION UNDER PROJECT GUTENBERG-tm
You may distribute copies of this etext electronically, or by
disk, book or any other medium if you either delete this
Small Print! and all other references to Project Gutenberg,
or:

[1]  Only give exact copies of it.  Among other things, this
requires that you do not remove, alter or modify the
etext or this small print! statement.  You may however,
if you wish, distribute this etext in machine readable
binary, compressed, mark-up, or proprietary form,
including any form resulting from conversion by word pro-
cessing or hypertext software, but only so long as
*EITHER*:

[*]  The etext, when displayed, is clearly readable, and
does *not* contain characters other than those
intended by the author of the work, although tilde
(~), asterisk (*) and underline (_) characters may
be used to convey punctuation intended by the
author, and additional characters may be used to
indicate hypertext links; OR

[*]  The etext may be readily converted by the reader at
no expense into plain ASCII, EBCDIC or equivalent
form by the program that displays the etext (as is
the case, for instance, with most word processors);
OR

[*]  You provide, or agree to also provide on request at
no additional cost, fee or expense, a copy of the
etext in its original plain ASCII form (or in EBCDIC
or other equivalent proprietary form).

[2]  Honor the etext refund and replacement provisions of this
Small Print! statement.

[3]  Pay a trademark license fee to the Project of 20% of the
net profits you derive calculated using the method you
already use to calculate your applicable taxes.  If you
dont derive profits, no royalty is due.  Royalties are
payable to Project Gutenberg Association/Carnegie-Mellon
University within the 60 days following each
date you prepare (or were legally required to prepare)
your annual (or equivalent periodic) tax return.

WHAT IF YOU *WANT* TO SEND MONEY EVEN IF YOU DONT HAVE TO?
The Project gratefully accepts contributions in money, time,
scanning machines, OCR software, public domain etexts, royalty
free copyright licenses, and every other sort of contribution
you can think of.  Money should be paid to Project Gutenberg
Association / Carnegie-Mellon University.

*END*THE SMALL PRINT! FOR PUBLIC DOMAIN ETEXTS*Ver.04.29.93*END*

This Etext was prepared by Stewart A. Levin of Englewood CO with
additional biographical information provided by Curtis Farrar of
Washington, D.C.

Songs for Parents

By John Farrar

Dedication

Heres a rhyme for Barbara,
Laughing white and pink,
Heres a rhyme for smiling Ted,
And one for Wink.

Now Dicks not much at reading rhymes,
Hed rather sit and fish.
Well heres a couple of verses, Dick,
Read them if you wish!

Contents

Dedication

SONGS OF DESIRE

Summer Explorer
Spring Wish
Ambition
Dreams
Water-Lily
Humor
Independence

SONGS FOR OUT OF DOORS

A Comparison
Speculation
Parade
Flower Preferences
Parental Advice
Song for a Child Watching Clouds
Problem
Garden Musings
My Garden
Tracks
Chanticleer
Rainbow
Windmill
Cat-Fish
Visiting
Castles
Parenthood

SONGS OF CIRCUMSTANCE

Moral Song
Serious Omission
Choice
Natural Fireworks
Conspiracy
Cuckoo Clock
The Sentinel
Royalty
Crackers
The Drum
Theatricals
Sally

SONGS FOR A CHRISTMAS TREE

Bundles
The Candy Santa Claus
The Tinsel Star
The Ambitious Mouse
Prayer

SONGS OF DESIRE

Summer Explorer

Id like to be a gypsy
With gold rings in my ears,
Along the road to sit and sing,
And not do another thing
For years and years;

A road to dream upon by day,
A fire for dreams at night,
Free to wander far away,
Free to shout and free to play,
Quite impolite.

Id pitch my tent beside a wall,
All apple trees within,
And if the apples didnt fall,
I wouldnt hesitate at all.
Id climb--and sin!

But if the weather wasnt fine,
If all the world were rain,
If there werent anywhere to dine
And goose-flesh quivered up my spine--
I _might_ come home again!

Spring Wish

A frogs a very happy thing,
Cool and green in early spring,
Quick and silver through the pool,
With no thought of books or school.

Oh, I want to be a frog,
Sunning, stretching on a log,
Blinking there in splendid ease,
Swimming naked when I please,
Nosing into magic nooks,
Quiet marshes, noisy brooks.

Free! And fit for anything!
Oh, to be a frog in spring!

Ambition

If I were a rocket
Shot high across the night,
Id rather burst in silver stars
Than green or purple light;

For then, perhaps, Id fool the moon,
Although shes very wise,
And thinking me a baby star
Shed keep me in the skies.

Dreams

Id like to dream my own dreams,
Instead of dreaming those
The silly sandman brings along
Like moving picture shows.

Id like to dream of palaces,
Of magic meadowlands,
Of silver gates and golden thrones
And chanting fairy bands;

Of seas of spraying jewels,
Of dancing crystal ships,
Of the queen of all the elves herself--
Two rubies for her lips;

But, alas! I never dream such things,
And when I jump and wake
As an oozy ogre clutches me--
Its just a stomach ache!

Water-Lily

Id like to be a water-lily sleeping on the river,
Where solemn rushes whisper, and funny ripples quiver.
All day Id watch the blue sky--all night Id watch the black,
Floating in the soft waves, dreaming on my back,
And when Id tired of dreaming, Id call a passing fish,
I want to find the sea! Id shout, Come!  You can grant my wish!

Hed bite me from my moorings, and softly I would slip
To the center of the river like an ocean-going ship.
The waves would laugh upon me.  The wind would blow me fast,
And oh, what shores and wonders would greet me as I passed!
Yes, if I were a water-lily, Id sail to sea in state--
A green frog for my captain--and a dragon-fly for mate!

Humor

Have you ever watched the clowns at play,
White, red and black on circus day?
Theyre always very, very gay.
I wonder how they stay that way!

Id like to be a clown,
Playing tricks around the town,
Turning somersaults and springs,
As if they were easy things,
Laughing morning, noon and night,
Being such a funny sight!

Do you think, then, Id grow tired of fun,
Laughing so from sun to sun?
Or, when performances are done,
Do clown-folk cry like anyone?

Independence

I like to go out in the night
When theres neither a sound nor a light,
With my hands and feet bare,
And the wind in my hair,
Not a nurse nor a parent in sight;

But only the night, moon and me
As I dance in the dew joyfully,
Quite daring and bold
For theres no one to scold,
Because there is no one to see.

SONGS FOR OUT OF DOORS

A Comparison

Apple blossoms look like snow,
Theyre different, though.
Snow falls softly, but it brings
Noisy things:
Sleighs and bells, forts and fights,
Cosy nights.

But apple blossoms when they go,
White and slow,
Quiet all the orchard space,
Till the place
Hushed with falling sweetness seems
Filled with dreams.

Speculation

I wonder if God sits alone
Upon the highest mountain stone
To stir the clouds and drop the rain,
And then to pick it up again.

I wonder if he sends the brooks
Foaming from their distant nooks,
And, sitting there in robes of gray,
Turns rivers on at break of day.

Parade

The scarlet trumpet flowers are gay
And yet they never seem to play,
They never trumpet up the dawn
Nor blow retreat across the lawn.

But oh, to-day I heard a strain,
A happy, martial, quick refrain,
As down across the garden grass
I saw the marching flowers pass:

Gaudy phlox and flaunting rose,
Stiff and straight and on their toes,
And, blaring from the garden wall,
The trumpet flower led them all.

Flower Preferences

If I were a tiny fairy
With nothing else to do
But to wriggle into flowers
All the long day through,

Id dance among the roses,
Id take a stately walk,
Balancing precisely
On an Easter-lily stalk.

For play Id choose the jonquils,
For swimming, poppy cups,
For jokes and tricks and tiny naps,
The Johnny-jump-ups!

But on some quiet evening,
Id leave my fairy band,
And on a star-flower through the sky
Id sail to fairyland.

Parental Advice

Who laid the egg that hatched the moon?
Was it the earth, I wonder,
Was it the sun, the clouds, or rain,
Was it night or thunder?

If I were mother to the moon
Id spank her every day
Until she learned to stay at home
And _never_ run away!

Song for a Child Watching Clouds

Ive watched the clouds by day and night,
Great fleecy ones all filled with light,
Gray beasts that steal across the sky,
And little fellows slipping by.

Sometimes they seem like sheep at play,
Sometimes when they are dull and gray
The pale sun seems a ship to me,
Sailing through a rolling sea;

And Ive seen faces in them too,
Funny white men on the blue,
They look so many different ways,
And not one single cloudlet stays;

But on across the heavens they blow,
I often wonder where they go,
Now sometime, maybe when I die,
I, too, will wander through the sky.

Problem

If I were a violet Id think it a shame
To be always so simple and modest and tame,
To be hidden away like a hermit or nun
While the hare-brained pink roses can dance in the sun!
But consider the naughty wild ways of the rose--
There _must_ be _respectable_ flowers, I suppose!

Garden Musings

Why is the lily so stately and still?
Why doesnt she dance like the gay daffodil?
Why doesnt she blush like the rose or the pink,
Or, like mischievous pansy, indulge in a wink?
Do you think its because she is holier than they,
Or did God just decide he would make her that way?

My Garden

My garden was silly and stubborn;
I worked, but the weeds worked, too;
I dug and scraped and scrambled--
They hustled themselves and grew;

Now Teds gardens fine and cleanly,
He has lettuce and roses and peas--
Oh, most probably plants are like children--
They only behave when they please!

Tracks

I wonder where the rabbits go
Who leave their tracks across the snow;
For when I follow to their den
The tracks always start out again.

Chanticleer

High and proud on the barnyard fence
Walks rooster in the morning.
He shakes his comb, he shakes his tail
And gives his daily warning.

Get up, you lazy boys and girls,
Its time you should be dressing!
I wonder if he keeps a clock,
Or if hes only guessing.

Rainbow

The rainbow comes across the hill,
It shines upon the sky, until
It frightens all the tears from rain,
And then it hides itself again.

Now when Im very tired of play
Ill cross that rainbow bridge some day;
And while dear nurse and father scold,
Ill reach the end--and find the gold!

Windmill

The windmill stands up like a flower on the hill
With its petals a-whirling--they seldom stay still--
And its funny old voice creaking all the long day
As it scolds little breezes for running away.

Cat-Fish

The cat-fish with whiskers that lives in the brook,
Is an ugly old beast with the wickedest look.
I suppose there were mouse-fish one time in brook town
Till that ugly old cat-fish gulped all of them down.

Visiting

You and I shall travel far,
Well pass the old earth by,
Well ride the moon and drive a star
Across the evening sky.

Well flash upon the milky way
To pay Dame Night a call--
But should we happen on old Day--
Wed fall and fall and fall.

Castles

I used to build me castles of moisty sand and shells,
And dream they were for princesses who wove me magic spells;
But yesterday along the beach my fairy princess came--
And shes too big for castles--now isnt that a shame!

Parenthood

The birches that dance on the top of the hill
Are so slender and young that they cannot keep still,
They bend and they nod at each whiff of a breeze,
For you see they are still just the children of trees.

But the birches below in the valley are older,
They are calmer and straighter and taller and colder.
Perhaps when weve grown up as solemn and grave,
We, too, will have children who do not behave!

SONGS OF CIRCUMSTANCE

Moral Song

Oh, so cool
In his deep green pool
Was a frog on a log one day!
He would blink his eyes
As he snapped at flies,
For his mother was away,
_For his mother was away!_

Now that naughty frog
Left his own home log
And started out to play.
He flipped and he flopped
And he never stopped
Till he reached the great blue bay,
_Till he reached the great blue bay!_

Alas, with a swish
Came a mighty fish,
And swallowed him where he lay.
Now its things like this
That never miss
Little frogs who dont obey,
_Little frogs who dont obey!_

Serious Omission

I know that there are dragons,
St. Georges, Jasons, too,
And many modern dragons
With scales of green and blue;

But though Ive been there many times
And carefully looked through,
I cant find a dragon
In the cages at the zoo!

Choice

If I had just one penny
On the Fourth of July,
Oh, what a problem it would be
To think what I should buy!

With lollypops and fire-works,
With cakes and whiz-bangs, too,
With tops and candy cigarettes,
Whatever should I do?

Torpedoes have a splendid noise,
But noise is quickly past,
And the sweetness of a lollypop
Is something that will last.

Natural Fireworks

The fireflies in the valley
Are having their display
Among the river willows
Like little bits of day!

Come, light your silver sparkler
And wave it in the air.
Go dance among the willows
And sprinkle sparkles there.

Then, oh, the world will wonder
To see the willows shine,
And even the fireflies will not know
Their tiny sparks from mine.

Conspiracy

The sun has a face that is laughing and red
When nurse pulls me out in the morning from bed;
But hes not half so sly as the silly old moon,
Who winks when Im sent to my bedroom too soon.

Cuckoo Clock

The cuckoo in the clock by day
Is usually very gay;
And thats because, with people near,
There