Gutenberg Project EText

Just another The University Blog site

The Right to Read by Richard M. Stallman

August27

**This is a COPYRIGHTED Project Gutenberg Etext, Details Below**

This is the Plain Vanilla Text version tycho10.txt or tycho10.zip
Also available in HTML format version tycho10h.txt or tycho10h.zip
Also as French HTML format version tycho10f.txt or tycho10f.zip

Please take a look at the important information in this header.
We encourage you to keep this file on your own disk, keeping an
electronic path open for the next readers.  Do not remove this.

**Welcome To The World of Free Plain Vanilla Electronic Texts**

**Etexts Readable By Both Humans and By Computers, Since 1971**

*These Etexts Prepared By Hundreds of Volunteers and Donations*

Information on contacting Project Gutenberg to get Etexts, and
further information is included below.  We need your donations.

The Right to Read

by Richard M. Stallman

Copyright 1996 Richard Stallman

Verbatim copying and distribution of this entire article is
permitted in any medium, provided this notice is preserved.

The Right to Read - GNU Project - Free Software Foundation (FSF)

November, 1999  [Etext #1981]

The Project Gutenberg Etext of The Right to Read, by Stallman
****This file should be named tycho10.txt or tycho10.zip*****

We are now trying to release all our books one month in advance
of the official release dates, for time for better editing.

Please note:  neither this list nor its contents are final till
midnight of the last day of the month of any such announcement.
The official release date of all Project Gutenberg Etexts is at
Midnight, Central Time, of the last day of the stated month.  A
preliminary version may often be posted for suggestion, comment
and editing by those who wish to do so.  To be sure you have an
up to date first edition [xxxxx10x.xxx] please check file sizes
in the first week of the next month.  Since our ftp program has
a bug in it that scrambles the date [tried to fix and failed] a
look at the file size will have to do, but we will try to see a
new copy has at least one byte more or less.

Information about Project Gutenberg (one page)

We produce about two million dollars for each hour we work.  The
fifty hours is one conservative estimate for how long it we take
to get any etext selected, entered, proofread, edited, copyright
searched and analyzed, the copyright letters written, etc.  This
projected audience is one hundred million readers.  If our value
per text is nominally estimated at one dollar then we produce $2
million dollars per hour this year as we release thirty-two text
files per month, or 384 more Etexts in 1998 for a total of 1500+
If these reach just 10% of the computerized population, then the
total should reach over 150 billion Etexts given away.

The Goal of Project Gutenberg is to Give Away One Trillion Etext
Files by the December 31, 2001.  [10,000 x 100,000,000=Trillion]
This is ten thousand titles each to one hundred million readers,
which is only 10% of the present number of computer users.  2001
should have at least twice as many computer users as that, so it
will require us reaching less than 5% of the users in 2001.

We need your donations more than ever!

All donations should be made to Project Gutenberg/CMU: and are
tax deductible to the extent allowable by law.  (CMU = Carnegie-
Mellon University).

For these and other matters, please mail to:

Project Gutenberg
P. O. Box  2782
Champaign, IL 61825

When all other email fails try our Executive Director:
Michael S. Hart <hart@pobox.com>

We would prefer to send you this information by email
(Internet, Bitnet, Compuserve, ATTMAIL or MCImail).

******
If you have an FTP program (or emulator), please
FTP directly to the Project Gutenberg archives:
[Mac users, do NOT point and click. . .type]

ftp uiarchive.cso.uiuc.edu
login:  anonymous
password:  your@login
cd etext/etext90 through /etext96
or cd etext/articles [get suggest gut for more information]
dir [to see files]
get or mget [to get files. . .set bin for zip files]
GET INDEX?00.GUT
for a list of books
and
GET NEW GUT for general information
and
MGET GUT* for newsletters.

**Information prepared by the Project Gutenberg legal advisor**
(Three Pages)

***START** SMALL PRINT! for COPYRIGHT PROTECTED ETEXTS ***
TITLE AND COPYRIGHT NOTICE:

Copyright 1996 Richard Stallman

Verbatim copying and distribution of this entire article is
permitted in any medium, provided this notice is preserved.

The Right to Read - GNU Project - Free Software Foundation (FSF)

This etext is distributed by Professor Michael S. Hart through
the Project Gutenberg Association at Carnegie-Mellon University
(the Project) under the Projects Project Gutenberg trademark
and with the permission of the etexts copyright owner.

LICENSE
You can (and are encouraged!) to copy and distribute this
Project Gutenberg-tm etext.  Since, unlike many other of the
Projects etexts, it is copyright protected, and since the
materials and methods you use will effect the Projects
reputation,
your right to copy and distribute it is limited by the copyright
laws and by the conditions of this Small Print! statement.

[A]  ALL COPIES: The Project permits you to distribute
copies of this etext electronically or on any machine readable
medium now known or hereafter discovered so long as you:

(1)  Honor the refund and replacement provisions of this
Small Print! statement; and

(2)  Pay a royalty to the Project of 20% of the net
profits you derive calculated using the method you already use
to calculate your applicable taxes.  If you dont derive
profits, no royalty is due.  Royalties are payable to Project
Gutenberg Association/Carnegie Mellon-University within
the 60 days following each date you prepare (or were legally
required to prepare) your annual (or equivalent periodic) tax
return.

[B]  EXACT AND MODIFIED COPIES: The copies you distribute
must either be exact copies of this etext, including this
Small Print statement, or can be in binary, compressed, mark-
up, or proprietary form (including any form resulting from
word processing or hypertext software), so long as *EITHER*:

(1)  The etext, when displayed, is clearly readable, and
does *not* contain characters other than those intended by the
author of the work, although tilde (~), asterisk (*) and
underline (_) characters may be used to convey punctuation
intended by the author, and additional characters may be used
to indicate hypertext links; OR

(2)  The etext is readily convertible by the reader at no
expense into plain ASCII, EBCDIC or equivalent form by the
program that displays the etext (as is the case, for instance,
with most word processors); OR

(3)  You provide or agree to provide on request at no
additional cost, fee or expense, a copy of the etext in plain
ASCII.

LIMITED WARRANTY; DISCLAIMER OF DAMAGES
This etext may contain a Defect in the form of incomplete,
inaccurate or corrupt data, transcription errors, a copyright
or other infringement, a defective or damaged disk, computer
virus, or codes that damage or cannot be read by your
equipment.  But for the Right of Replacement or Refund
described below, the Project (and any other party you may
receive this etext from as a PROJECT GUTENBERG-tm etext)
disclaims all liability to you for damages, costs and
expenses, including legal fees, and YOU HAVE NO REMEDIES FOR
NEGLIGENCE OR UNDER STRICT LIABILITY, OR FOR BREACH OF
WARRANTY OR CONTRACT, INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO INDIRECT,
CONSEQUENTIAL, PUNITIVE OR INCIDENTAL DAMAGES, EVEN IF YOU
GIVE NOTICE OF THE POSSIBILITY OF SUCH DAMAGES.

If you discover a Defect in this etext within 90 days of
receiving it, you can receive a refund of the money (if any)
you paid for it by sending an explanatory note within that
time to the person you received it from.  If you received it
on a physical medium, you must return it with your note, and
such person may choose to alternatively give you a replacement
copy.  If you received it electronically, such person may
choose to alternatively give you a second opportunity to
receive it electronically.

THIS ETEXT IS OTHERWISE PROVIDED TO YOU AS-IS.  NO OTHER
WARRANTIES OF ANY KIND, EXPRESS OR IMPLIED, ARE MADE TO YOU AS
TO THE ETEXT OR ANY MEDIUM IT MAY BE ON, INCLUDING BUT NOT
LIMITED TO WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY OR FITNESS FOR A
PARTICULAR PURPOSE.  Some states do not allow disclaimers of
implied warranties or the exclusion or limitation of
consequential damages, so the above disclaimers and exclusions
may not apply to you, and you may have other legal rights.

INDEMNITY
You will indemnify and hold the Project, its directors,
officers, members and agents harmless from all liability, cost
and expense, including legal fees, that arise directly or
indirectly from any of the following that you do or cause:
[1] distribution of this etext, [2] alteration, modification,
or addition to the etext, or [3] any Defect.

WHAT IF YOU *WANT* TO SEND MONEY EVEN IF YOU DONT HAVE TO?
Project Gutenberg is dedicated to increasing the number of
public domain and licensed works that can be freely distributed
in machine readable form.  The Project gratefully accepts
contributions in money, time, scanning machines, OCR software,
public domain etexts, royalty free copyright licenses,
and whatever else you can think of.  Money should be paid to
Project Gutenberg Association/Carnegie-Mellon University.

*SMALL PRINT! Ver.04.29.93 FOR COPYRIGHT PROTECTED ETEXTS*END*

Copyright 1996 Richard Stallman

Verbatim copying and distribution of this entire article is
permitted in any medium, provided this notice is preserved.

The Right to Read - GNU Project - Free Software Foundation (FSF)

The Right to Read

by Richard Stallman

Copyright 1996 Richard Stallman

Verbatim copying and distribution of this entire article is
permitted in any medium, provided this notice is preserved.

Table of Contents

Authors Note
References
Other Texts to Read

This article appeared in the February 1997 issue
of Communications of the ACM (Volume 40, Number 2).

The Right to Read

by Richard Stallman

Copyright 1996 Richard Stallman

Verbatim copying and distribution of this entire article is
permitted in any medium, provided this notice is preserved.

(from The Road To Tycho, a collection of articles
about the antecedents of the Lunarian Revolution,
published in Luna City in 2096)

For Dan Halbert, the road to Tycho began in college--when Lissa Lenz
asked to borrow his computer.  Hers had broken down, and unless she
could borrow another, she would fail her midterm project.  There was
no one she dared ask, except Dan.

This put Dan in a dilemma.  He had to help her--but if he lent her his
computer, she might read his books.  Aside from the fact that you
could go to prison for many years for letting someone else read your
books, the very idea shocked him at first.  Like everyone, he had been
taught since elementary school that sharing books was nasty and
wrong--something that only pirates would do.

And there wasnt much chance that the SPA--the Software Protection
Authority--would fail to catch him.  In his software class, Dan had
learned that each book had a copyright monitor that reported when and
where it was read, and by whom, to Central Licensing.  (They used this
information to catch reading pirates, but also to sell personal
interest profiles to retailers.)  The next time his computer was
networked, Central Licensing would find out.  He, as computer owner,
would receive the harshest punishment--for not taking pains to prevent
the crime.

Of course, Lissa did not necessarily intend to read his books.  She
might want the computer only to write her midterm.  But Dan knew she
came from a middle-class family and could hardly afford the tuition,
let alone her reading fees.  Reading his books might be the only way
she could graduate.  He understood this situation; he himself had had
to borrow to pay for all the research papers he read.  (10% of those
fees went to the researchers who wrote the papers; since Dan aimed for
an academic career, he could hope that his own research papers, if
frequently referenced, would bring in enough to repay this loan.)

Later on, Dan would learn there was a time when anyone could go to the
library and read journal articles, and even books, without having to
pay.  There were independent scholars who read thousands of pages
without government library grants.  But in the 1990s, both commercial
and nonprofit journal publishers had begun charging fees for access.
By 2047, libraries offering free public access to scholarly literature
were a dim memory.

There were ways, of course, to get around the SPA and Central
Licensing.  They were themselves illegal.  Dan had had a classmate in
software, Frank Martucci, who had obtained an illicit debugging tool,
and used it to skip over the copyright monitor code when reading
books.  But he had told too many friends about it, and one of them
turned him in to the SPA for a reward (students deep in debt were
easily tempted into betrayal).  In 2047, Frank was in prison, not for
pirate reading, but for possessing a debugger.

Dan would later learn that there was a time when anyone could have
debugging tools.  There were even free debugging tools available on CD
or downloadable over the net.  But ordinary users started using them
to bypass copyright monitors, and eventually a judge ruled that this
had become their principal use in actual practice.  This meant they
were illegal; the debuggers developers were sent to prison.

Programmers still needed debugging tools, of course, but debugger
vendors in 2047 distributed numbered copies only, and only to
officially licensed and bonded programmers.  The debugger Dan used in
software class was kept behind a special firewall so that it could be
used only for class exercises.

It was also possible to bypass the copyright monitors by installing a
modified system kernel.  Dan would eventually find out about the free
kernels, even entire free operating systems, that had existed around
the turn of the century.  But not only were they illegal, like
debuggers--you could not install one if you had one, without knowing
your computers root password.  And neither the FBI nor Microsoft
Support would tell you that.

Dan concluded that he couldnt simply lend Lissa his computer.  But he
couldnt refuse to help her, because he loved her.  Every chance to
speak with her filled him with delight.  And that she chose him to ask
for help, that could mean she loved him too.

Dan resolved the dilemma by doing something even more unthinkable--he
lent her the computer, and told her his password.  This way, if Lissa
read his books, Central Licensing would think he was reading them.  It
was still a crime, but the SPA would not automatically find out about
it.  They would only find out if Lissa reported him.

Of course, if the school ever found out that he had given Lissa his
own password, it would be curtains for both of them as students,
regardless of what she had used it for.  School policy was that any
interference with their means of monitoring students computer use was
grounds for disciplinary action.  It didnt matter whether you did
anything harmful--the offense was making it hard for the
administrators to check on you.  They assumed this meant you were
doing something else forbidden, and they did not need to know what it
was.

Students were not usually expelled for this--not directly.  Instead
they were banned from the school computer systems, and would
inevitably fail all their classes.

Later, Dan would learn that this kind of university policy started
only in the 1980s, when university students in large numbers began
using computers.  Previously, universities maintained a different
approach to student discipline; they punished activities that were
harmful, not those that merely raised suspicion.

Lissa did not report Dan to the SPA.  His decision to help her led to
their marriage, and also led them to question what they had been
taught about piracy as children.  The couple began reading about the
history of copyright, about the Soviet Union and its restrictions on
copying, and even the original United States Constitution.  They moved
to Luna, where they found others who had likewise gravitated away from
the long arm of the SPA.  When the Tycho Uprising began in 2062, the
universal right to read soon became one of its central aims.

Authors Note

The right to read is a battle being fought today.  Although it may
take 50 years for our present way of life to fade into obscurity, most
of the specific laws and practices described above have already been
proposed--either by the Clinton Administration or by publishers.

There is one exception: the idea that the FBI and Microsoft will keep
the root passwords for personal computers.  This is an extrapolation
from the Clipper chip and similar Clinton Administration key-escrow
proposals, together with a long-term trend: computer systems are
increasingly set up to give absentee operators control over the people
actually using the computer system.

The SPA, which actually stands for Software Publishers Association,
is not today an official police force.  Unofficially, it acts like
one.  It invites people to inform on their coworkers and friends; like
the Clinton Administration, it advocates a policy of collective
responsibility whereby computer owners must actively enforce copyright
or be punished.

The SPA is currently threatening small Internet service providers,
demanding they permit the SPA to monitor all users.  Most ISPs
surrender when threatened, because they cannot afford to fight back in
court.  (Atlanta Journal-Constitution, 1 Oct 96, D3.)  At least one
ISP, Community ConneXion in Oakland CA, refused the demand and was
actually sued.  The SPA is said to have
dropped this suit recently, but they are sure to continue the campaign
in various other ways.

The university security policies described above are not imaginary.
For example, a computer at one Chicago-area university prints this
message when you log in (quotation marks are in the original):

This system is for the use of authorized users only.  Individuals using
this computer system without authority or in the excess of their authority
are subject to having all their activities on this system monitored and
recorded by system personnel.  In the course of monitoring individuals
improperly using this system or in the course of system maintenance, the
activities of authorized user may also be monitored.  Anyone using this
system expressly consents to such monitoring and is advised that if such
monitoring reveals possible evidence of illegal activity or violation of
University regulations system personnel may provide the evidence of such
monitoring to University authorities and/or law enforcement officials.

This is an interesting approach to the Fourth Amendment: pressure most
everyone to agree, in advance, to waive their rights under it.

References

The administrations White Paper: Information Infrastructure Task
Force, Intellectual Property and the National Information
Infrastructure: The Report of the Working Group on Intellectual
Property Rights (1995).

An explanation of the White Paper:
The Copyright Grab, Pamela Samuelson, Wired, Jan. 1996

Sold Out,
James Boyle, New York Times, 31 March 1996

Public Data or Private Data, Washington Post, 4 Nov 1996
Union for the Public Domain--a new organization which aims to resist
and reverse the overextension of intellectual property powers.

For Other Texts to Read
Return to GNUs home page [www.gnu.org]

FSF &amp; GNU inquiries &amp; questions to
gnu@gnu.org.
Other ways to contact the FSF.

Comments on these web pages to
webmasters@www.gnu.org,
send other questions to
gnu@gnu.org.

Copyright 1996 Richard Stallman

Verbatim copying and distribution of this entire article is
permitted in any medium, provided this notice is preserved.

Updated:

12 Feb markg

The Right to Read - GNU Project - Free Software Foundation (FSF)

End of The Project Gutenberg Etext of The Right to Read, by Stallman

For Other Texts to Read
Return to GNUs home page [www.gnu.org]

FSF &amp; GNU inquiries &amp; questions to
gnu@gnu.org.
Other ways to contact the FSF.

Comments on these web pages to
webmasters@www.gnu.org,
send other questions to
gnu@gnu.org.

Copyright 1996 Richard Stallman

Verbatim copying and distribution of this entire article is
permitted in any medium, provided this notice is preserved.

Updated:

12 Feb markg

The Right to Read - GNU Project - Free Software Foundation (FSF)

End of The Project Gutenberg Etext of The Right to Read, by Stallman

BERITA BINUS : Peringkat 234 Regional Rankings Asia 2020, Wujud Komitmen BINUS UNIVERSITY Bagi Nusantara

posted under Uncategorized

Email will not be published

Website example

Your Comment: